I don't think I have ever heard so much about super moons and different colors of moons in my life. For some reason, it seems like recently these not-so-novel lunar events are constantly in the news.

This month, get ready for yet another super moon. This time though, it's strawberry flavored.

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On June 24, you can look to the sky as the moon is rising to see the strawberry moon. It's called this because of the strawberry harvesting season. It doesn't really have much to do with the color of the moon at all on that date.

This strawberry moon will be of the super variety, meaning that it will be closer to the Earth making it appear larger. On the the website timeanddate.com, it lists the moonrise time for Amarillo as 9:30 PM on June 24.

In one article, it was suggested that this is going to be the last "super" moon of the year. That could be debated though, as I found out there isn't real strict criteria on what is or is not technically a super moon.

I guess if the moon looks a like it's put on a few pounds, you can consider it a super moon?

Surely I'm not alone in thinking that the term "super moon" and all of these crazy names for the different full moons are just now becoming headline fodder. Growing up, I don't remember ever hearing about all of these different moons with specific names. So far, my favorite has been Super Flower Blood Moon.

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